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NASA | NIRCam Gets Integrated into Webb's ISIM

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08.04.2014

Engineers install the Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam) into the Webb Telescope's Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) in NASA Goddard Space Flight Center cleanroom. The delicate procedure took place on March 20, 2014 in preparation for the cryogenic test of a fully integrated ISIM structure that will occur this summer. The Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam) is Webb's primary imager that will cover the infrared wavelength range 0.6 to 5 microns. NIRCam will detect light from: the earliest stars and galaxies in the process of formation; the population of stars in nearby galaxies; as well as young stars in the Milky Way and Kuiper Belt objects. NIRCam is equipped with coronagraphs, instruments that allow astronomers to take pictures of very faint objects around a central bright object, like stellar systems. NIRCam's coronagraphs work by blocking a brighter object's light, making it possible to view the dimmer object nearby - just like shielding the sun from your eyes with an upraised hand can allow you to focus on the view in front of you. With the coronagraphs, astronomers hope to determine the characteristics of planets orbiting nearby stars. The NIRCam instrument was built and designed by the University of Arizona and Lockheed Martin. This video is public domain and can be downloaded at: 🤍 Like our videos? Subscribe to NASA's Goddard Shorts HD podcast: 🤍 Or find NASA Goddard Space Flight Center on Facebook: 🤍 Or find us on Twitter: 🤍

NASA | Webb's NIRCam optical module arrives at NASA

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02.08.2013

The optical module of Webb Telescope's primary imager, the Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam) arrives at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center on Saturday, July 27, 2013. This video is public domain and can be downloaded at: 🤍 Like our videos? Subscribe to NASA's Goddard Shorts HD podcast: 🤍 Or find NASA Goddard Space Flight Center on Facebook: 🤍 Or find us on Twitter: 🤍

JWST's Near-InfraRed Camera (NIRCAM)

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16.01.2013

Animation of Near-InfraRed Camera (NIRCam) instrument rotating (with embedded alpha channel) The James Webb Space Telelscope carries 4 science instruments: the Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI), the Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam), the Near-Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec), and the Fine Guidance Sensor / Near InfraRed Imager adn Slitless Spetrograph (FGS/NIRISS). All four instruments are housed in the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM). Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio Download this video: 🤍

JWST 2016 - Imaging with NIRCam (M. Roberto)

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00:22:46
20.03.2017

The first workshop in this series took place at ESA's European Space Astronomy Center (ESAC) near Madrid on September 26-28, 2016. The main goal of this first workshop was to present to help prospective JWST users to select the best observing modes to achieve their science goals.

James Webb Space Telescope's NIRSpec Multi Object Spectrograph Animation

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24.09.2021

The NIRSpec instrument is the workhorse near-infrared spectrograph on board the James Webb Space Telescope and is provided by ESA. The primary goal of NIRSpec is to enable large spectroscopic surveys of astronomical objects such as stars or distant galaxies. This is made possible by its powerful multi-object spectroscopy mode, which makes use of microshutters. This mode is capable of obtaining spectra of up to nearly 200 objects simultaneously, over a 3.6×3.4 arcminute field of view – the first time this capability has been provided from space. This mode makes for very efficient use of Webb’s valuable observing time. This animation shows the path followed by light from an astronomical object as it travels through the NIRSpec components and onto the detector. ~ 0:22 min: The light from the telescope enters NIRSpec via the Pick-off Mirror. ~ 0.27 min: The second flat mirror directs the beam towards the FORE optics that form an image of the sky onto the Micro Shutter Assembly (MSA). ~ 0:36 min: The light passes through a Filter Wheel Assembly (FWA) for selecting specific wavelength bands and through the refocusing mechanism (RMA). ~ 0:42 min: A sharp image of the sky is formed onto the MSA plane. ~ 0:46 min: Light that passed through open MSA shutters enters the spectrometer. ~ 0:49 min: The collimator optics brings the beam to the Grating Wheel Assembly (GWA). ~ 0:52 min: The Grating or Prism unravels the incoming beam in all its wavelengths by dispersing it vertically. ~ 0:55 min: The Camera optical system forms spectra of each scientific object onto the detector. NIRSpec will allow scientists to study objects embedded in shrouds of gas and dust, to find out more about how galaxies formed and evolved, and to characterise the atmospheres of extrasolar planets to determine if water is present. Source: 🤍

Zoom Into the Southern Ring Nebula - Using James Webb's NIRCam Image

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15.07.2022

This video zooms through space to reveal Webb’s Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) image of the Southern Ring Nebula. The bright star at the centre of NGC 3132, while prominent when viewed by the NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Telescope in near-infrared light, plays a supporting role in sculpting the surrounding nebula. A second star, barely visible at lower left along one of the bright star’s diffraction spikes, is the nebula’s source. It has ejected at least eight layers of gas and dust over thousands of years. Data from Webb’s Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) were used to make this extremely detailed image. It is teeming with scientific information — and research will begin following its release. More information and download options: 🤍 Credit: NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI, and the Webb ERO Production Team Music: tonelabs - Happy Hubble (tonelabs.com) This video is a Creative Commons Attribution license (reuse allowed) Tags: #nasa #jwst #southernringnebula #J0624-6948 #supernova #jwst1stimage #jwstasteroidhit #webbtelescopeupdates #rockyworld #exoplanets #55Cancrie #jwstnews #jwstupdate #mars #saturn #cassini #saturnrings #saturnmoon #jameswebbspacetelescope #webbtelescope #jwst #universe #mysterioussignal #galaxy #webbtelescopeupdates #jwstimages #photons #firstgalaxy #webbtelescopeupdates #interstellar #webbselfie #webbtelescopeimage #alienlife #jwstasteroid #asteroidtracking #jameswebbspacetelescope #nasa #galaxy #star #spacenews #nasanews #webbtelscopenewimages #HD84406 #webbtelescopeupdates

Overview of Imaging with NIRCam and MIRI from JWebbinar 6

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28.10.2021

This video from JWebbinar 6, “NIRCam and MIRI Point-Source Imaging,” gives an overview of the NIRCam and MIRI instruments and best practices for observations. This is the first video in the series. The other videos are: 2. Aperture Photometry with MIRI 3. PSF Photometry with NIRCam View the materials covered in this video: 🤍 View the JWebbinars page on the JWST Observer website: 🤍

JWST 2016 - Slitless Spectroscopy with NIRCam (E. Egami)

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00:19:52
20.03.2017

The first workshop in this series took place at ESA's European Space Astronomy Center (ESAC) near Madrid on September 26-28, 2016. The main goal of this first workshop was to present to help prospective JWST users to select the best observing modes to achieve their science goals. 🤍

PSF Photometry with NIRCam from JWebbinar 6

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00:39:12
28.10.2021

This video from JWebbinar 6, “NIRCam and MIRI Point-Source Imaging,” demonstrates how to do PSF photometry on a NIRCam dataset. This is the third video in the series. The other videos are: 1. Overview of Imaging with NIRCam and MIRI 2. Aperture Photometry with MIRI View the materials covered in this video: 🤍 View the JWebbinars page on the JWST Observer website: 🤍

NIRCam Simulations - Workflow from JWebbinar 13

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00:31:18
15.04.2022

This video from JWebbinar 13, “CEERS: NIRCam and MIRI Imaging,” shows how to do the data reduction for NIRCam data. This is the third video in the series. The other videos are: 1. CEERS Overview 2. CEERS Catalogs and Simulations 3. NIRCam Simulations - Presentation 5. MIRI Simulations - Presentation 6. MIRI Simulations - Workflow View the materials covered in this video: 🤍 View the JWebbinars page on the JWST Observer website: 🤍

NIRCam Simulations - Presentation from JWebbinar 13

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00:08:31
15.04.2022

This video from JWebbinar 13, “CEERS: NIRCam and MIRI Imaging,” presents the simulations and the data reduction with NIRCam. This is the third video in the series. The other videos are: 1. CEERS Overview 2. CEERS Catalogs and Simulations 4. NIRCam Simulations - Workflow 5. MIRI Simulations - Presentation 6. MIRI Simulations - Workflow View the materials covered in this video: 🤍 View the JWebbinars page on the JWST Observer website: 🤍

Zoom Into the Southern Ring Nebula (NIRCam Image)

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14.07.2022

This video zooms through space to reveal Webb’s Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) image of the Southern Ring Nebula. The bright star at the centre of NGC 3132, while prominent when viewed by the NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Telescope in near-infrared light, plays a supporting role in sculpting the surrounding nebula. A second star, barely visible at lower left along one of the bright star’s diffraction spikes, is the nebula’s source. It has ejected at least eight layers of gas and dust over thousands of years. Data from Webb’s Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) were used to make this extremely detailed image. It is teeming with scientific information — and research will begin following its release. More information and download options: 🤍 Credit: NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI, and the Webb ERO Production Team Music: tonelabs - Happy Hubble (tonelabs.com)

NIRCam: Your Next Near-Infrared Camera (2/16/16)

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00:57:44
20.10.2017

JWST Community Lecture on "NIRCam: Your Next Near-Infrared Camera" by Marcia Rieke. Presented on February 16, 2016 at Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI). Please Note: This video was created before the postponed Cycle 1 General Observer Call for Proposals (April 2018). As such, the tools or information in this video may have changed. For the latest information on JWST tools and functionality, please consult JDox: 🤍

Pan of the Webb’s Portrait of the Pillars of Creation (NIRCam)

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19.10.2022

The Pillars of Creation are set off in a kaleidoscope of colour in the NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope’s near-infrared-light view. The pillars look like arches and spires rising out of a desert landscape, but are filled with semi-transparent gas and dust, and ever changing. This is a region where young stars are forming – or have barely burst from their dusty cocoons as they continue to form. Protostars are the scene-stealers in this Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) image. These are the bright red orbs that sometimes appear with eight diffraction spikes. When knots with sufficient mass form within the pillars, they begin to collapse under their own gravity, slowly heat up, and eventually begin shining brightly. Along the edges of the pillars are wavy lines that look like lava. These are ejections from stars that are still forming. Young stars periodically shoot out jets that can interact within clouds of material, like these thick pillars of gas and dust. This sometimes also results in bow shocks, which can form wavy patterns like a boat does as it moves through water. These young stars are estimated to be only a few hundred thousand years old, and will continue to form for millions of years. Although it may appear that near-infrared light has allowed Webb to “pierce through” the background to reveal great cosmic distances beyond the pillars, the interstellar medium stands in the way, like a drawn curtain. This is also the reason why there are no distant galaxies in this view. This translucent layer of gas blocks our view of the deeper universe. Plus, dust is lit up by the collective light from the packed “party” of stars that have burst free from the pillars. It’s like standing in a well-lit room looking out a window – the interior light reflects on the pane, obscuring the scene outside and, in turn, illuminating the activity at the party inside. Webb’s new view of the Pillars of Creation will help researchers revamp models of star formation. By identifying far more precise star populations, along with the quantities of gas and dust in the region, they will begin to build a clearer understanding of how stars form and burst out of these clouds over millions of years. The Pillars of Creation is a small region within the vast Eagle Nebula, which lies 6,500 light-years away. Webb’s NIRCam was built by a team at the University of Arizona and Lockheed Martin’s Advanced Technology Center. More information and download options: 🤍 Credit: NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI, J. DePasquale, A. Koekemoer, A. Pagan, N. Bartmann Music: Stellardrone – Twilight

How James Webb's Instruments Work - and What They'll Show Us!

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14.02.2022

How James Webb's Science Instruments Work and What They'll Show Us! The first 1,000 people to use this link will get a 1 month free trial of Skillshare: 🤍 The James Webb Space Telescope's science instruments are a combination of near and mid-infrared cameras, coronagraphs, and spectrographs that will reveal details never seen before. 00:00 Intro MIRI Filter Wheel 00:54 Webb's Science Field of View 02:05 Cooling Down 03:41 Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) 06:06 Near-Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) 08:00 Near Infrared Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (FGS-NIRISS) 10:56 Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) 16:51 Skillshare 17:48 Patrons 🔔 Subscribe for more: 🤍 🖖 Share this video with a fellow space traveler: 🤍 🔴 Watch my most recent upload: 🤍 🚀 Help me improve the channel by joining the community on Patreon 🤍 🚀 Check out Launch Pad merchandise! 🤍 Disclaimer: Some of these links go to one of my websites and some are affiliate links where I'll earn a small commission if you make a purchase at no additional cost to you. 🧭 References: JWST User Documentation: 🤍 ✅ Let's connect: For business inquiries - chris AT christianready DOT com Twitter - 🤍launchpadastro Instagram - 🤍launchpadastro Facebook - 🤍 Discord - 🤍 📭 c/o Christian Ready P.O. Box 66 Westminster, MD 21158 United States Earth

James Webb Space Telescope's MIRI Spectroscopy Animation

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24.09.2021

The Mid-InfraRed Instrument (MIRI) of the James Webb Space Telescope (Webb) sees light in the mid-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum, at wavelengths that are longer than our eyes can see. To support the whole range of Webb’s science goals, from observing our own Solar System and other planetary systems, to studying the early Universe, MIRI allows scientists to use multiple observing techniques: imaging, spectroscopy and coronagraphy. To pack all these modes in a single instrument, engineers have designed an intricate optical system in which light coming from Webb’s telescope follows a complex 3D path before finally reaching MIRI’s detectors. This artist’s rendering shows the path for MIRI’s Medium Resolution Spectroscopy module, or MRS. Whereas the Low Resolution Spectroscopy mode is designed to observe single, compact objects like very distant galaxies or single stars, the MRS can produce spectra of its entire field of view. As a result, this part of MIRI is ideally suited for observations of more complex and extended objects, such as closer-by galaxies, crowded fields of stars and galaxies, or nebulae. We first take a look at its mechanical structure with its three protruding pairs of carbon fibre struts that will attach it to Webb’s instrument compartment at the back of the telescope. The beam of light coming from the telescope is then shown in deep blue entering the instrument through the pick-off mirror located at the top of the instrument and acting like a periscope. Then, a series of mirrors redirect the light toward the bottom of the instruments where a set of 4 spectroscopic modules are located. Once there, the beam of light is divided by optical elements called dichroics in 4 beams corresponding to different parts of the mid-infrared region. Each beam enters its own integral field unit; these components split and reformat the light from the whole field of view, ready to be dispersed into spectra. This requires the light to be folded, bounced and split many times, making this probably one of Webb’s most complex light paths. To finish this amazing voyage, the light of each beam is dispersed by gratings, creating spectra that then projects on 2 MIRI detectors (2 beams per detector). An amazing feat of engineering! Source: 🤍

Ultra high resolution image of Southern Ring Nebula (NIRCam) taken by Webb's telescope

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12.07.2022

Ultra-high-resolution image of Southern Ring Nebula (NIRCam) taken by Webb's telescope 🤍Science Dawn Credits: IMAGE: NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI 🤍

JWST 2016 - SOS with NIRCAM (T. Greene)

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20.03.2017

The first workshop in this series took place at ESA's European Space Astronomy Center (ESAC) near Madrid on September 26-28, 2016. The main goal of this first workshop was to present to help prospective JWST users to select the best observing modes to achieve their science goals. 🤍

Webb Showcases the Cartwheel Galaxy (NIRCam and MIRI Composite Image + MIRI Image)

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03.08.2022

🤍 This video showcases two new views of the Cartwheel Galaxy from the NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope. The first image of the Cartwheel and its companion galaxies is a composite from Webb’s Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) and Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI), which reveals details that are difficult to see in the individual images alone. The second image highlights the mid-infrared light captured by MIRI to reveal fine details about these dusty regions and young stars within the Cartwheel Galaxy. Credit: NASA, ESA, CSA, and STScI. Music: Stellardrone – Twilight

تلسكوب جيمس ويب | الأجهزة العلمية | NIRCam

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11.01.2022

ما يميز تلسكوب جيمس ويب الفضائي هي اجهزته العلمية، والتي ستوفر لنا رؤية لم نكن نحلم بها للكون والمجرات والنجوم البعيدة جدا . ضمن هذه الاجهزة المبتكرة "المثيرة للاهتمام" هي كاميرا الاشعة تحت الحمراء القريبة NIRCam. لمتابعة آخر التحديثات والتطورات في رحلة تلسكوب جيمس ويب الفضائي لا تنسى الاعجاب والاشتراك بالقناة.

L1527 and Protostar (NIRCam Image) by James Webb Telescope @Science Dawn

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17.11.2022

#jwst #nasa #jwstimages Credits SCIENCE: NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI IMAGE PROCESSING: Joseph DePasquale (STScI), Alyssa Pagan (STScI), Anton M. Koekemoer (STScI) 🤍Science Dawn

New Released James Webb Space Telescope Image - L1527 (NIRCam Image)@ (4K UHD - 60 FPS) [11/25/2022]

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New Released James Webb Space Telescope Image - L1527 (NIRCam Image)🤍 (4K UHD - 60 FPS) [11/25/2022] Date: 11/25/2022 Video Edit by: Vanja Hriberski [C_O_D_E] NASA releases #New James Webb Space Telescope's Image NASA’s Webb NIRCam The protostar within the dark cloud L1527, shown in this image from NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam), is embedded within a cloud of material feeding its growth. Ejections from the star have cleared out cavities above and below it, whose boundaries glow orange and blue in this infrared view. The upper central region displays bubble-like shapes due to stellar “burps,” or sporadic ejections. Webb also detects filaments made of molecular hydrogen that has been shocked by past stellar ejections. The edges of the cavities at upper left and lower right appear straight, while the boundaries at upper right and lower left are curved. The region at lower right appears blue, as there’s less dust between it and Webb than the orange regions above it. Credits SCIENCE: NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI IMAGE PROCESSING: Joseph DePasquale (STScI), Alyssa Pagan (STScI), Anton M. Koekemoer (STScI) About The Object Object Name L1527 IRS (IRAS 04368+2557) Object Description Young Stellar Object R.A. Position 04:39:53.59 Dec. Position +26:03:05.50 Constellation Taurus Distance About 460 light-years Dimensions Image is 2.2 arcmin across (about 0.3 light-years) About The Data Data Description This image was created from JWST data from proposal: 2739 (K. Pontoppidan) Instrument JWST - NIRCam Exposure Dates 08 Sep 2022 Filters F200W, F335M, F444W, F470N About The Image Color Info These images are a composite of separate exposures acquired by the James Webb Space Telescope using the NIRCam instrument. Several filters were used to sample different infrared wavelength ranges. The color results from assigning different hues (colors) to each monochromatic (grayscale) image associated with an individual filter. In this case, the assigned colors are: Blue: F200W, Green: F335M, Red: F444W, Orange: F470N

Pan of Webb’s First Deep Field (NIRCam Image)

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12.07.2022

This video features the thousands of galaxies that flood this near-infrared image of galaxy cluster SMACS 0723. High-resolution imaging from the NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope combined with a natural effect known as gravitational lensing made this finely detailed image possible. More information and download options: 🤍 Credit: NASA, ESA, CSA, and STScI Music: Stellardrone – Twilight

4K 60fps Zoom in of the JWST NIRCam image of Neptune

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21.09.2022

NASA has released an image of Neptune taken with the Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam) on board the Jamse Webb Space Telescope. The image is 2.2 arcminutes wide (about 0.04° in the sky, or 1/13th the Moon's apparent width). This video zooms in to Neptune. 🤍

Turn the lights up 💡Webb Showcases the Cartwheel Galaxy NIRCam and MIRI Composite Image

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03.08.2022

JWST was able to peek through the dust that hid the Cartwheel Galaxy from view when previous telescopes studied it by using infrared light detection. This picture is a combination of data from JWST's Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) and Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI). Higher-resolution versions are available on the JWST website. Data from the JWST's primary imager, NIRCam, is coloured blue, orange, and yellow, while MIRI data is coloured red. According to NASA, the blue spots seen in the crimson swirls of dust are individual stars or regions of star development. "NIRCam also reveals the difference between the smooth distribution or shape of the older star populations and dense dust in the core compared to the clumpy shapes associated with the younger star populations outside of it,"the agency said. Meanwhile, MIRI was able to learn more about the galaxy's dust. It discovered areas rich in hydrocarbons and other chemical components, as well as silicate dust, which is identical to much of the dust on Earth. These areas create numerous spiralling spokes, leading to the Cartwheel Galaxy's name. The spokes were previously imaged by Hubble, but they are sharper in the JWST data. Tags: #nasa #jwst #catwheelgalaxy #NGC346 #SN1987a #NGC-628 #TRAPPIST-1E #smac0723 #J0624-6948 #supernova #jwst1stimage #jwstasteroidhit #webbtelescopeupdates #rockyworld #exoplanets #55Cancrie #jwstnews #jwstupdate #mars #saturn #cassini #saturnrings #saturnmoon #jameswebbspacetelescope #webbtelescope #jwst #universe #mysterioussignal #galaxy #webbtelescopeupdates #jwstimages #photons #firstgalaxy #webbtelescopeupdates #interstellar #webbselfie #webbtelescopeimage #alienlife #jwstasteroid #asteroidtracking #jameswebbspacetelescope #nasa #galaxy #star #spacenews #nasanews #webbtelscopenewimages #HD84406 #webbtelescopeupdates

Pan of the Tarantula Nebula (NIRCam Image)

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06.09.2022

In this mosaic image stretching 340 light-years across, Webb’s Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) displays the Tarantula Nebula star-forming region in a new light, including tens of thousands of never-before-seen young stars that were previously shrouded in cosmic dust. The most active region appears to sparkle with massive young stars, appearing pale blue. Scattered among them are still-embedded stars, appearing red, yet to emerge from the dusty cocoon of the nebula. NIRCam is able to detect these dust-enshrouded stars thanks to its unprecedented resolution at near-infrared wavelengths. More information and download options: 🤍 Credit: NASA, ESA, CSA, and STScI, N. Bartmann Music: Stellardrone – Twilight

Pan of the Southern Ring Nebula (NIRCam Image)

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12.07.2022

This video features Webb’s Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) image of the Southern Ring Nebula. The bright star at the centre of NGC 3132, while prominent when viewed by the NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Telescope in near-infrared light, plays a supporting role in sculpting the surrounding nebula. A second star, barely visible at lower left along one of the bright star’s diffraction spikes, is the nebula’s source. It has ejected at least eight layers of gas and dust over thousands of years. Data from Webb’s Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) were used to make this extremely detailed image. It is teeming with scientific information — and research will begin following its release. More information and download options: 🤍 Credit: NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI, and the Webb ERO Production Team Music: Stellardrone - Stardome

Webb’s First Deep Field (MIRI and NIRCam Images Side by Side)

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12.07.2022

This video features the views of the NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope’s MIRI and NIRCam instruments of the galaxy cluster SMACS 0723. The differences in Webb’s images are owed to the technical capabilities of the MIRI and NIRCam instruments. MIRI captures mid-infrared light, which highlights where the dust is. Dust is a major ingredient for star formation. Stars are brighter at shorter wavelengths, which is why they appear with prominent diffraction spikes in the NIRCam image. More information and download options: 🤍 Credit: NASA, ESA, CSA, and STScI Music: Stellardrone – Twilight

Video Snapshot: Arrival of the NIRCam Optical Module at NASA Goddard

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02.08.2013

The NIRCam Optical Module arrived at NASA Goddard in July 27, 2013. The NIRCam or Near Infrared Camera is the primary imager on the James Webb Space Telescope. It will detect light from the earliest stars and galaxies that formed in the universe. Download a high-resolution version of this video here: 🤍

JWST’s MIRI and NIRCam images of the Pillars of Creation

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29.10.2022

In October 2022, the NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) released two beautiful images of the Pillars of Creation, located within the Eagle Nebula, roughly 6500 light-years from Earth. The first image released was the Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) on October 19, then the Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI) image on October 28. Thank you for watching! Sources: 🤍 🤍 Music: Drifting at 432 Hz - Unicorn Heads #shorts

JWST Stephan's Quintet NIRCam and MIRI Composite Image & Turpak - Aurora #shorts

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07.11.2022

Image: Stephan's Quintet Music: Aurora - Turpak #unitune #shortvideo #short #jameswebbspacetelescope About This Image: 🤍 An enormous mosaic of Stephan’s Quintet is the largest image to date from NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope, covering about one-fifth of the Moon’s diameter. It contains over 150 million pixels and is constructed from almost 1,000 separate image files. The visual grouping of five galaxies was captured by Webb’s Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) and Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI). With its powerful, infrared vision and extremely high spatial resolution, Webb shows never-before-seen details in this galaxy group. Sparkling clusters of millions of young stars and starburst regions of fresh star birth grace the image. Sweeping tails of gas, dust and stars are being pulled from several of the galaxies due to gravitational interactions. Most dramatically, Webb’s MIRI instrument captures huge shock waves as one of the galaxies, NGC 7318B, smashes through the cluster. These regions surrounding the central pair of galaxies are shown in the colors red and gold. This composite NIRCam-MIRI image uses two of the three MIRI filters to best show and differentiate the hot dust and structure within the galaxy. MIRI sees a distinct difference in color between the dust in the galaxies versus the shock waves between the interacting galaxies. The image processing specialists at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore opted to highlight that difference by giving MIRI data the distinct yellow and orange colors, in contrast to the blue and white colors assigned to stars at NIRCam’s wavelengths. Together, the five galaxies of Stephan’s Quintet are also known as the Hickson Compact Group 92 (HCG 92). Although called a “quintet,” only four of the galaxies are truly close together and caught up in a cosmic dance. The fifth and leftmost galaxy, called NGC 7320, is well in the foreground compared with the other four. NGC 7320 resides 40 million light-years from Earth, while the other four galaxies (NGC 7317, NGC 7318A, NGC 7318B, and NGC 7319) are about 290 million light-years away. This is still fairly close in cosmic terms, compared with more distant galaxies billions of light-years away. Studying these relatively nearby galaxies helps scientists better understand structures seen in a much more distant universe. This proximity provides astronomers a ringside seat for witnessing the merging of and interactions between galaxies that are so crucial to all of galaxy evolution. Rarely do scientists see in so much exquisite detail how interacting galaxies trigger star formation in each other, and how the gas in these galaxies is being disturbed. Stephan’s Quintet is a fantastic “laboratory” for studying these processes fundamental to all galaxies. Tight groups like this may have been more common in the early universe when their superheated, infalling material may have fueled very energetic black holes called quasars. Even today, the topmost galaxy in the group – NGC 7319 – harbors an active galactic nucleus, a supermassive black hole that is actively accreting material. In NGC 7320, the leftmost and closest galaxy in the visual grouping, NIRCam was remarkably able to resolve individual stars and even the galaxy’s bright core. Old, dying stars that are producing dust clearly stand out as red points with NIRCam. The new information from Webb provides invaluable insights into how galactic interactions may have driven galaxy evolution in the early universe. As a bonus, NIRCam and MIRI revealed a vast sea of many thousands of distant background galaxies reminiscent of Hubble’s Deep Fields. NIRCam was built by a team at the University of Arizona and Lockheed Martin’s Advanced Technology Center. MIRI was contributed by ESA and NASA, with the instrument designed and built by a consortium of nationally funded European Institutes (The MIRI European Consortium) in partnership with JPL and the University of Arizona. For a full array of Webb’s first images and spectra, including downloadable files, please visit: 🤍 Credits: IMAGE: NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI

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06.12.2021

NIRCam TSO Performance & Caveats from JWebbinar 16

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29.07.2022

This video from JWebbinar 16, “JWST Time Series Observations: Performance and Caveats,” covers what was learned about time series observations with NIRCam during commissioning. This is the second video in the series. The other videos are: 1. Introduction to TSOs 3. TSO NIRSpec 4. TSO NIRISS 5. TSO MIRI View the materials covered in this video: 🤍 View the JWebbinars page on the JWST Observer website: 🤍

NASA James Webb Space Telescope Capture New Image with the nircam camera

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28.04.2022

NASA James Webb Space Telescope Capture New Image with the nircam camera

Pan of the Carina Nebula (NIRCam Image)

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12.07.2022

This video highlights a nearby, young, star-forming region called NGC 3324 in the Carina Nebula. Captured in infrared light by the Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) on the NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope, this image reveals previously obscured areas of star birth. Called the Cosmic Cliffs, this rim of a gigantic, gaseous cavity is roughly 7,600 light-years away. More information and download options: 🤍 Credit: NASA, ESA, CSA, and STScI Music: Mylonite - Breath of my Soul

Webb Showcases the Cartwheel Galaxy (NIRCam and MIRI Composite Image + MIRI Image)

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02.08.2022

This video showcases two new views of the Cartwheel Galaxy from the NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope. The first image of the Cartwheel and its companion galaxies is from Webb's Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI), which reveals fine details about dusty regions and young stars within the Cartwheel Galaxy. The second image is a composite from Webb’s Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) and MIRI. More information and download options: 🤍 Credit: NASA, ESA, CSA, and STScI. Music: Stellardrone – Twilight

NASA James Webb Space Telescope Capture Carina Nebula with Cosmic Cliffs Using NIRCam Image

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13.07.2022

What looks much like craggy mountains on a moonlit evening is actually the edge of a nearby, young, star-forming region NGC 3324 in the Carina Nebula. Captured in infrared light by the Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) on NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope, this image reveals previously obscured areas of star birth. Called the Cosmic Cliffs, the region is actually the edge of a gigantic, gaseous cavity within NGC 3324, roughly 7,600 light-years away. The cavernous area has been carved from the nebula by the intense ultraviolet radiation and stellar winds from extremely massive, hot, young stars located in the center of the bubble, above the area shown in this image. The high-energy radiation from these stars is sculpting the nebula’s wall by slowly eroding it away. NIRCam – with its crisp resolution and unparalleled sensitivity – unveils hundreds of previously hidden stars, and even numerous background galaxies. Several prominent features in this image are described below. The “steam” that appears to rise from the celestial “mountains” is actually hot, ionized gas and hot dust streaming away from the nebula due to intense, ultraviolet radiation. Dramatic pillars rise above the glowing wall of gas, resisting the blistering ultraviolet radiation from the young stars. Bubbles and cavities are being blown by the intense radiation and stellar winds of newborn stars. Protostellar jets and outflows, which appear in gold, shoot from dust-enshrouded, nascent stars. A “blow-out” erupts at the top-center of the ridge, spewing gas and dust into the interstellar medium. An unusual “arch” appears, looking like a bent-over cylinder. This period of very early star formation is difficult to capture because, for an individual star, it lasts only about 50,000 to 100,000 years – but Webb’s extreme sensitivity and exquisite spatial resolution have chronicled this rare event. Located roughly 7,600 light-years away, NGC 3324 was first catalogued by James Dunlop in 1826. Visible from the Southern Hemisphere, it is located at the northwest corner of the Carina Nebula (NGC 3372), which resides in the constellation Carina. The Carina Nebula is home to the Keyhole Nebula and the active, unstable supergiant star called Eta Carinae. NIRCam was built by a team at the University of Arizona and Lockheed Martin’s Advanced Technology Center. For a full array of Webb’s first images and spectra, including downloadable files, please visit: 🤍 Credits: IMAGE: NASA, ESA, CSA, STScI

NASA Webb Space Telescope Capture Jupiter and its moon Europa Using NIRCam

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17.07.2022

Jupiter, center, and its moon Europa, left, are seen through the James Webb Space Telescope’s NIRCam instrument 2.12 micron filter. Credits: NASA, ESA, CSA, and B. Holler and J. Stansberry (STScI)

JAMES WEBB | CARINA NEBULA | COSMIC CLIFFS by NASA / STScI - NEW PICTURE - NIRCam 4K

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30.07.2022

What looks much like craggy mountains on a moonlit evening is actually the edge of a nearby, young, star-forming region NGC 3324 in the Carina Nebula. Captured in infrared light by the Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam) on NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope, this image reveals previously obscured areas of star birth. Called the Cosmic Cliffs, the region is actually the edge of a gigantic, gaseous cavity within NGC 3324, roughly 7,600 light-years away. The cavernous area has been carved from the nebula by the intense ultraviolet radiation and stellar winds from extremely massive, hot, young stars located in the center of the bubble, above the area shown in this image. The high-energy radiation from these stars is sculpting the nebula’s wall by slowly eroding it away. NIRCam – with its crisp resolution and unparalleled sensitivity – unveils hundreds of previously hidden stars, and even numerous background galaxies. Several prominent features in this image are described below. The “steam” that appears to rise from the celestial “mountains” is actually hot, ionized gas and hot dust streaming away from the nebula due to intense, ultraviolet radiation. Dramatic pillars rise above the glowing wall of gas, resisting the blistering ultraviolet radiation from the young stars. Bubbles and cavities are being blown by the intense radiation and stellar winds of newborn stars. Protostellar jets and outflows, which appear in gold, shoot from dust-enshrouded, nascent stars. A “blow-out” erupts at the top-center of the ridge, spewing gas and dust into the interstellar medium. An unusual “arch” appears, looking like a bent-over cylinder. Source: 🤍 Check out my other NASA video with images from the Hubble Space Telescope 🤍 Be blessed The song: Becharot by Kimberly and Alberto Rivera 🤍

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